Richmond Home

Weinstein-Rosenthal Forum on Faith, Ethics, & Global Society

The Making of Citizen: What It Means to Be an American Citizen in "Post-racial" Society

Keynote by best-selling poet and author Claudia Rankine
Wed., Sept. 29, 2021, 7 p.m.
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Center for the Arts

Because of COVID-19 guidelines, in-person attendance in Camp Concert Hall is limited, and we have reached capacity. All are welcome to attend via the live stream.  Registration for the live stream is required and may be completed through the Modlin Center Box Office at the link provided below. The event will not be recorded. 

https://tickets.modlin.richmond.edu/weinstein-rosenthal

About Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine.Claudia Rankine is the author of five books of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don't Let Me Be Lonely; three plays including HELP, which premiered in March 2020 (The Shed, NYC), and The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/ American Repertory Theater) and was published by Graywolf Press in 2019; as well as numerous video collaborations. Her recent collection of essays, Just Us: An American Conversation, was published by Graywolf Press in 2020. She is also the co-editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. In 2016, Rankine co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets & Writers' Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. A former Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry at Yale University, Claudia Rankine recently joined the NYU Creative Writing Program.

For additional information, please visit: http://claudiarankine.com/

About Citizen: An American Lyric (2014)

Cover image of citizenClaudia Rankine's book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV—everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named “post-race” society. 

Questions? Contact:

Bryn Bagby Taylor
Associate Chaplain
bryn.taylor@richmond.edu